Crossroads Carnegie Art Center

Crossroads Carnegie
Art Center

History of the Crossroads Arts Center

Crossroads Arts Center

The Oregon Trail Arts Association was founded in 1963 to recognize the educational and psychological value of what art programs could do to impact a community. When Baker County dedicated its new library in 1970, the Oregon Trail Arts Council (our name at the time) saw an opportunity for a permanent home; our request to occupy the Carnegie Library Building was granted in 1971. In 1977, Crossroads Creative and Performing Arts Center, gained its non-profit status. In 1971, Crossroads moved in the Carnegie Library Building and thus began its storied relationship with one of Baker City's grand old buildings.

As the oldest continuously operating art centers East of Cascades Crossroads continue to evolve and grow as one of the finest regional art centers in Oregon.

For a complete history of Crossroads and the Carnegie Library see this word document Provided by Jan Kirby, Director.

Mission/Vision of Crossroads Carnegie Art Center

Crossroads Carnegie Art Center

Adopted May 2, 2007
The mission of the Crossroads Carnegie Art Center, Inc., a 501(c)3 non-profit founded in 1963, is to create opportunities for the entire community to be engaged, inspired, and transformed by the arts through participation in classes, workshops, exhibits, mentorships, and partnerships – A welcoming place where people meet and the arts speak.

Crossroads works to fulfill its mission through:

Community-wide programs such as:

"First Friday" exhibits that showcase artists and music

Acting as a community partner to attract art-based industries

And Also: Workshops and course offerings developed through individual community partner requests;

Leona Fleetwood

Leona Fleetwood was the children's librarian at the Baker City Carnegie Library (1940), and later, head librarian of the Carnegie Library (1942-1960).

Leona Fleetwood

Leona was one of the founding members of Crossroads Creative and Performing Arts Center and the downstairs stage is named in honor of Leona and her husband, Orville, who were lifelong supporters of the arts. Until her death on October 20, 1983, Leona Fleetwood's zest for living and learning activated and energized a multitude of community activities.

Leona Fleetwood performing a puppet show

Click here to download Leona's complete eulogy in word format.